Help my puppy is chewing up the house - Royal Canin
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Help my puppy is chewing up the house

Managing a puppy’s teething phase

Chewing is normal puppy behaviour and we cannot stop them from doing it. Just about now, your puppy may be teething, starting to replace their milk teeth with adult teeth, and chewing can help with the process. However, that means your favourite shoes or cushions may turn into a chew toy at any time! 

Chewing is normal puppy behaviour and we cannot stop them from doing it. Later on, they will continue to chew as they learn about the world around them by using their mouth. 

So provide plenty of opportunity to exercise their normal behaviour with lots of toys that they can chew. Rotate toys so that there is always something new and interesting, removing any that are damaged. If they start to chew something they shouldn’t, firmly say ‘no’ straight away and replace the object of their attention with chew toys for dogs. When left unsupervised, ensure chewable objects are kept out of your puppy’s reach.

Your puppy may be teething, starting to replace their milk teeth with adult teeth, and chewing can help with the process of dog teething.

How many teeth does my puppy have?

0-4 months:

Puppies are born with no teeth and the first milk teeth start to appear at around 3 weeks of age. Most of your puppy’s 32 milk teeth will have erupted by the age of 6 weeks, with the first premolar appearing at around 4 months and remaining in the adult phase.

3-5 months:

Between the ages of around 3 and 5 months, the milk teeth start to make way for 42 adult dog teeth. Their roots are resorbed, they fall out, and are replaced by adult teeth. During this process puppies often start chewing everything in sight, as it helps to relieve any discomfort and encourages the process. Remember to provide your puppy with lots of toys and dog chews. Ensure that they cannot get to anything dangerous. It is quite usual not to find the lost teeth, quite simply because the puppy has swallowed them, which is entirely harmless for their health.

6 months:

At six months, your puppy’s dentition is almost complete, even if the teeth have not yet reached their adult size.

Maintain your puppy’s dental hygiene

The teething period can be quite uncomfortable for your puppy, it is important not to introduce tooth brushing at this stage – your puppy might develop an aversion to the procedure. However, it is a good idea to handle the mouth regularly from an early age and get your puppy used to the feel of something in their mouth. Here’s how you can go about it.

  1. Gently hold your puppy still and place your hand over their muzzle.
  2. Then very carefully rub a cotton bud, or even just your finger (taking care not to place it between the teeth!) inside the cheek and along the teeth.
  3. Give your puppy plenty of praise.
  4. Practice regularly.

This way, once your puppy is about 6 months old, they will be happy to let you start brushing their teeth, which is the best way to help keep them clean and healthy.

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